Pavarotti sings Lucio Dalla’s Caruso

Caruso!

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In 1986, Lucio Dalla wrote the words and music for this amazing song. The song relays the pain and longing of a man about to die while spending time with the woman he loves.

Luciano Pavarotti took it a step further with his emotional and amazing voice. Pavarotti expressed the agony and pain Dalla expressed in his song.

Enjoy Caruso, sung by Pavarotti and created by Lucio Dalla, God rest their souls.

Two of O Henry’s Beloved Short Stories

One of my favorite authors ever is O Henry. Opinions differ strongly on the man’s work but he is as realistic in his recounting as Norman rockwell was in his painting.

Having read then left his stories on a shelf for a long time, in the last few days, I ran across them when downloading books to listen to. Taking O Henry with me on my evening walk, he again inspired me. The stories he wove are simple and the characters interesting and attractive. His surprise endings remain appealing and sometimes even jarring.

The next day, I sat at my work table and drew out book covers for two of his short stories. Yes, I know we do not “publish” on paper much these days but what can I say, I was inspired. I share with you two of his stories and include places where you can get them absolutely free to read and enjoy.

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The Last Leaf

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The Gift of the Magi

Book Review: Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley

Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley

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Aldous Huxley

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Book Cover: Crome Yellow

I kept waiting for things to happen in this story but you could say my mind is marred by the fast pace of the present. At a lazy and wonderful pace of the country home, things do happen.

A true 20s piece of literature, Crome Yellow describes the descent of several people on a country estate to mooch off the owner. A collection of individuals different and lost as it were in their time spend all their time eating, drinking and doing silly activities even to the extent of hurting themselves. Set in post WWI, morality clashed with life and everyone looked for the truth and reality in their life and what they learned from the horrors of the war.

Huxley satirized the home he frequented with other authors and artists. An image of Garsington Manor, Crome Yellow represented the same refuge and home of Lady Ottoline Morrell.

In the mix is our hero Daniel, a lost poet looking for the next few words. An artist, a young woman, another woman just a bit older, a woman who gambles and lives for the stars, an astrologer and author and so on. These people gather, discuss and ponder the morality of their time. In the mix is a minister who kept a sermon around for so long, it ill-fit the time he repeated it to his congregation.

A historian who is hell bent on writing about Crome Yellow reads to the group from his writings which he finished. Going back and forth between the past and the present showed morality in its best and worst. Nothing changes much as far as that goes. You either have the morals or you do not and it is personal not national.

Well worth the read, Crome Yellow left me a little dazed and much saddened.